Sunday, April 19, 2015

Easiest Pumpernickel Pancakes

So it's been years since my last post.

I'm still enjoying life in Alberta (even more so now that it's big city life), just... focused on other things for a good long while. But life is feeling a little empty, and it's time to start writing again.

If I open my curtains a little bit more at night, I wake up naturally due to sunlight in the morning, which is a beautiful thing. I think that's how it's supposed to go. It's easiest this time of year, when it gets me up around 9 am.

What does that mean? It means I, night owl, have actually been making breakfast. Today, that breakfast was pumpernickel pancakes.


More...
As usual, I spent at least a quarter of an hour just browsing through recipes. Two questions whenever I start on one of my experimental bents: 1) Has it been done before? 2) Can I do it? I like to try strange things, but I also need to know that it worked out for someone else in the world.

Well, based on the answer to the first question, the answer to the second question seemed to be a backtracking no. They all wanted egg whites (no separation for this girl!
) and yogurt. Technically, I had sour cream, a perfectly acceptable substitute, but the man of the house develops bloodhound senses when he suspects the taste of cream products. Such is his hate of dairy. I have to look up a lot of kosher or vegan recipes (his digestive system is sensitive to eggs).

So I decided to make them anyway, modifying a much easier recipe for whole wheat pancakes that has its origins in Cooks Illustrated.

Easiest Pumpernickel Pancakes

Yields 6-8 regular-sized (picture a CD) pancakes

Wet ingredients:
2 Tbsp melted butter
1 cup buttermilk OR 1 cup milk and 1 Tbsp lemon juice/vinegar
1 egg

Dry ingredients:
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup pumpernickel flour
1 Tbsp cocoa powder
2 Tbsp sugar (it was supposed to be 2 tsp, but I read it wrong and have no regrets)
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt

Instructions:
  1. Melt butter; in the microwave for 30 seconds does just fine.
  2. Add other wet ingredients - buttermilk/ milk + lemon juice/vinegar, and egg - beat with a fork, and set aside.
  3. Combine dry ingredients in a mixing bowl and stir to mix.
  4. Set a non-stick frying pan on the stove on medium-high heat.
  5. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and mix until combined. Don't overmix - getting it all wet is enough. It may look a little soupy, but not to worry!
  6. Using an 1/4 cup or 1/3 cup scoop, pour the batter onto the frying pan. I was able to fit three pancakes onto mine. Turn down heat to medium.
  7. When pancake no longer sticks to the bottom of the pan but will slide when given a good poke (around 1 minute), it can be flipped to cook the other side, or if both sides are done, served.

    Notes:
    It helps to have a large flipper like this.

    Since these pancakes turn a chocolaty brown, you can't judge when to flip based on colour. It's easy for them to look burnt even when perfectly cooked.
I usually have delicious Costco maple syrup, but it's run out, so we ate these with margarine and weird-tasting No Name butter-flavoured syrup. Guess I have spoiled tastebuds!